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Mohua Wines

Mohua Wines Sauvignon Blanc bottleMohua Wines Pinot Noir bottleSauvignon
Blanc
Pinot
Noir
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2015

Sauvignon Blanc

Ripe and juicy tropical fruits, rich stone fruit and fresh cut lime combined with notes of fresh picked summer herbs.

Sub Regions
Lower Wairau, Rapaura, Southern Valleys
Harvest Date
21 May - 10 April
Clone
MS (mass select)
Residual Sugar
4.0 g/l
Alcohol
12.5%
pH
3.23
TA
7.48
Brix
20.4 - 23.0
Cellaring
1 - 2 years
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2014

Sauvignon Blanc

Fresh and juicy with ripe citrus, grapefruit, melon and passionfruit.

Sub Regions
Lower Wairau, Wairau Valley and Southern Valleys
Harvest Date
31 March – 16 April 2014
Residual Sugar
4.5 grams per litre
Alcohol
12.5%
pH
3.25
TA
7.1
Brix
20.5 – 23.1
Clone
MS
Cellaring
1 – 2 years
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2013

Sauvignon Blanc

A pure and vibrant Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, rich in flavours of ripe passionfruit, nectarine and lime.

Sub Regions
Lower Wairau and Southern Valleys
Harvest Date
31 March – 16 April
Residual Sugar
5.0 grams per litre
Alcohol
12.5%
pH
3.2
TA
7.2
Brix
20.7 – 23.1
Clone
MS
Cellaring
1 – 2 years
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Sauvignon Blanc

An elegant expression of the world-renowned Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, its grapes are sourced from three premier Wairau Valley sub-regions, bringing distinct and consistent characteristics to every vintage.

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tasting notes
Mohua Wines Sauvignon Blanc bottle

Serving Suggestions

Sauvignon Blanc

Intense green fruit flavours blend with crisp acidity and lifted tropical notes to enhance a broad range of cuisines. Try a classic seafood or white meat pairing, together with a fresh salad or enjoy with cheeses, tapas and Asian-style dishes.

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our recipes

Lindsay’s Fresh Fish Open Sandwich

As an avid fan of the ocean’s bounty, Lindsay regularly pulls out this great casual option. A great alternative is to grill the fish on a barbecue.

  • 600 g of fresh white-flesh fish
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 8 slices of fresh crusty bread
  • Salsa

For the salsa:

  • 300g cherry tomatoes
  • ½ Red onion
  • 2 Ripe pears
  • 2 Avocados
  • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • Salt and ground pepper
  • Juice from three fresh lemons

Prep time 25min / cook time 15min / serves 4.

Prepare the salsa in advance and make sure it is cold to serve.

First prepare the salsa by finely chopping the cherry tomatoes, red onion, pear and avocado. Place into a bowl and add the ginger and lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper. Mix the ingredients together and place in fridge for at least 45min and ensure this is cold when serving.

Heat oil in a large fry pan and fast fry the fish fillets until cooked through. Place the fish on toasted crusty bread and spoon the salsa on top. A glass of Mohua Sauvignon Blanc would be a great match for this meal.

The Brother’s Steamed Mussels

This favourite has been whipped up by Fraser and his brother Blair on numerous occasions and is a regular feature on the fishing trip menu with Lindsay.

  • 4 doz fresh mussels in their shells
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2-3 tsp finely chopped fresh ginger
  • 1-2 tsp finely chopped fresh chilli
  • 1 cup (250ml) of Mohua Sauvignon Blanc
  • 425 g tin of coconut milk (optional)
  • Finely grated zest of one lemon
  • 1/4 cup of coriander or parsley leaves

Prep time 20min / Cook time 10min / Serves 6 as a starter or 4 as a main.

For a more filling main course, try adding coconut milk to make a tasty broth and serve with fresh crusty bread.

First scrub the mussels shells under cold running water and pull out their beards. Discard any mussels that have broken shells or that do not close.

Heat oil in a large, deep pot or fry pan and sizzle chilli and ginger for about 30 seconds. Add the mussels, coconut milk (optional), Mohua Sauvignon Blanc and lemon zest. Cover and cook over high heat until the mussels open (approx. 5min). Discard any mussels that do not open.

Garnish with coriander or parsley leaves, and accompany this with a glass of Mohua Sauvignon Blanc.

Marlborough

Sauvignon Blanc

In the heart of the world-class Wairau Valley, we source our fruit from sub-regions selected for the distinct characteristics each location brings to the wine. These vineyards enjoy bright, cool climatic conditions that promote a long, slow ripening period and intensified flavours. Careful yield control then guarantees exceptional fruit from one of the globe’s finest sauvignon blanc regions.

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region

Marlborough
Sauvignon Blanc

In the heart of the world-class Wairau Valley, we source our fruit from sub-regions selected for the distinct characteristics each location brings to the wine. These vineyards enjoy bright, cool climatic conditions that promote a long, slow ripening period and intensified flavours. Careful yield control then guarantees exceptional fruit from one of the globe’s finest sauvignon blanc regions.

Lower Wairau

Sauvignon Blanc grapes from the Lower Wairau sub-region provide rounded, mouth filling fruit weight and contribute ripe, tropical, pineapple and guava characters to our blend due to the climate, geography and soil profile of the area.

Geography: The Lower Wairau is a very small sub-region positioned between the Blenheim Township and the north eastern coast of the South Island. The flat terrain and coastal influence on the Lower Wairau make this a highly desirable sub-region for growing Sauvignon Blanc.

Climate: The area is bright and warm, with an average of approximately 1,300 growing degree days per year. Given the proximity to the coast the temperature range is less extreme than other sub-regions of Marlborough, however the long ripening period experiences a notably diurnal temperature pattern. Rainfall in the sub-region is generally very low as any rain is directed along the Richmond Ranges, or out from the east coast by the Wither Hills.

Soil: The soil profile of the Lower Wairau generally features river gravels well below a deep, nutrient rich layer of silt topsoil which has been collected from further upstream and deposited by the Wairau River as it has meandered over the valley over thousands of years.

Central Wairau

The Central Wairau was one of the earliest established vineyard sub-regions in Marlborough. This sub-region produces fruit with the passionfruit, gooseberry and boxwood characters typically associated with Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.

Geography: The Central Wairau sits between Renwick and the Blenheim Township in the heart of the Wairau Valley. This area is a flat river plain which gradually tightens to the

Climate: The proximity of the Wither Hills to the south and Richmond Ranges to the north result in generally warmer and wetter conditions than the Lower Wairau. This average wind run in the Central Wairau is less than the Lower Wairau due to the distance from the coast.

Soil: The soil profile in the Central Wairau sub-region varies from north to south as a result of the Wairau River washing the topsoil along the valley towards the eastern coast and depositing it in the Lower Wairua sub-region. Most of the Central Wairau has a free draining soil profile characterised by a thinner layer of nutrient rich topsoil than the Lower Wairau, and river gravels close to, if not visible on, the surface.

Southern Valleys

The Southern Valleys sub-region produces Sauvignon Blanc grapes which are crisp and fresh with balanced acidity. On the palate this fruit has a sophisticated structure is balanced by ripe stone fruit and citrus flavours and aromas. The Southern Valleys sub-region provides elegance and length to the Mohua Sauvignon Blanc blend.

Geography: The Southern Valleys are tight valley formations running south to north out of the Wither Hills and into the main Wairau Valley plain. Each valley has unique characteristics, but the features these all share are that they were glacial formed and have gradual gains in altitude towards the south ending with north facing slopes at the base of the Wither Hills.

Climate: This group of valleys generally experience a cooler and drier climate than the main Wairau Valley. The valleys are generally protected from rainfall which is diverted off the east coast or hugs the Richmond ranges when coming up the west coast. The sub-region experiences a significant diurnal weather pattern which provides intensity and concentration to the fruit.

Soil: The soil profile can vary from valley to valley, however the soil generally features a layer of silt topsoil with a significant influence of clay, and river gravels below.

Pinot Noir

Capturing the essence and excitement of Central Otago in every glass, the hand-picked fruit of this dramatic Pinot Noir embody the character and purity of a major new wine region.

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tasting notes

2013

Pinot Noir

A floral scented rich and juicy Pinot Noir. Layered with fine tannins, raspberry and blackcurrant, wild strawberry and spice flavours.

Sub Regions
Bendigo 46%, Pisa 14% Gibbston 40%
Vintage Detail
A cooler spring followed by a wonderful warm summer and autumn frosts to finish
Harvest Date
6 April – 30 April 2013
Residual Sugar
2.0 grams per litre
Alcohol
13.0%
pH
3.53
TA
6.2
Brix
23.6 – 24.4
Clone
5, 6, 10/5, Abel, 115, 667 and 777
Maturation
10 months in French Oak
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2012

Pinot Noir

A silky smooth, elegant Pinot Noir full of cherry, raspberry, liquorice and cranberry flavours with brown spice and savoury notes.

Sub Regions
Bendigo 23%, Pisa 15% Gibbston 62%
Hand-Harvested
100%
Harvest Date
1 April – 2 May 2012
Residual Sugar
<2.0 grams per litre
Alcohol
13.0%
pH
3.51
TA
6.2
Brix
23.0 – 24.5
Clone
5, 6, 10/5, Abel, 115, 667 and 777
Maturation
10 months in French Oak
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Mohua Wines Pinot Noir bottle

Serving Suggestions

Pinot Noir

This balanced and soft-textured wine is an ideal accompaniment to savoury dishes. Match it with lean meats, fish and cheeses or partner with seasonal ingredients such as mushrooms, truffles, sweet vegetables or autumn fruits.

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our recipes

Jude’s Braised Lamb Shanks

The smell of this dish often wafts from the kitchen when Jude has her hands on lamb or goat shanks. Try this succulent recipe with our Mohua Pinot Noir.

  • 2 tbsp flour
  • salt and ground black pepper
  • 8 lamb shanks
  • 3 tbsp oil
  • 4 whole heads garlic, halved crosswise
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • few drops hot pepper sauce
  • 1 ¼ cups (375ml) Mohua Central Otago Pinot Noir
  • 2 sprigs rosemary, stalks removed and leaves chopped
  • 2 cups beef or lamb stock

Prep time 20min / Cook time 3hrs / Serves 4 – 6.

Preheat oven to 180°C. Place flour in a clean plastic bag with salt and a generous grind of pepper. Add shanks and shake to lightly coat.

Heat oil in a large, heavy-based pan and brown shanks in batches. Transfer to a large baking dish along with garlic halves. Discard excess fat from pan, add tomato paste and cook a minute or two to let the flavour develop. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a fast simmer. Stir well to lift any pan sediments then pour over meat. Cover and bake for 2hrs (or if serving at once and not reheating, cook for 2½-3hrs or until very tender).

Cool, chill then remove any fat that sits on top. To reheat, bring back to room temperature then cook a further 1 hour at 160°C.

Serve shanks with the sauce from the baking dish and a garlic half, mash, and peas or beans.

KJ’s Mushroom Bruschetta

This simple recipe is a versatile lunch, canapé or starter. KJ would say there is never enough, particularly when brothers Fraser and Blair are around.

  • 300g mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 5 – 6 tbsp good quality mayonnaise
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 8 large slices of sourdough or 20 small rounds of French stick

Prep time 10min / Cook time 25min.

Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Mix the mushroom slices with just enough roasted garlic aioli or mayonnaise to coat them and season with salt and pepper. Pile the mushroom mixture onto the slices of bread and bake for 20–30min until the bread is crunchy on the base and the mushrooms are golden. Serve hot with a glass of Mohua Pinot Noir.

Our Story

Generations in the making, Mohua Wines was founded in 2009 to create exceptional wines from some of New Zealand’s highest quality regions. Driven by one family’s passion for great wine-making, our focus is on merging that vision with sustainable practices to craft wines that capture the essence of their environment, while improving the land that creates them. Great wine begins in the vineyard – we help it on its journey.

ConservationThe Family

Central Otago

Pinot Noir

The long, dry Autumns of Central Otago provide the perfect location for producing landmark pinot noir. The region’s broad diurnal temperature range is complemented by extremely favourable soil and microbiota conditions, resulting in fruit that captures the unique feel of this rugged and spectacular area.

Explore this
region

Central Otago
Pinot Noir

The long, dry Autumns of Central Otago provide the perfect location for producing landmark pinot noir. The region’s broad diurnal temperature range is complemented by extremely favourable soil and microbiota conditions, resulting in fruit that captures the unique feel of this rugged and spectacular area.

Gibbston

Refined aromas of wild thyme and earth loam, with earthy and red berry flavours, elegant minerality and a fine tannin structure are the typical characteristics of Pinot Noir grapes from the Gibbston sub-region.

Geography: Situated 30km from Queenstown, Gibbston is the most western wine growing sub-region of Central Otago, with north facing slopes and a tight valley floor.

Climate: The narrow valley results in lower sunshine hours, with an average of only 970 growing degree days per year. The limited sunshine also results in a strong diurnal temperature pattern with warm days accompanying cool nights. This cooler climate generally requires a longer growing season than the Bendigo and Pia/Lowburn sub-regions and results in fruit being harvested 3 weeks later on average.

Altitude: Gibbston is the highest of the three sub-regions, with the valley floor sitting at 400m above sea level. The high altitude has a significant influence on the climate and results in the average temperature range in February being 7-30C (45-85F) which is below that in Bendigo and Pisa/Lowburn 10-35C (50-95F).

Pisa/Lowburn

The Pisa/Lowburn sub-region produces Pinot Noir grapes that provide round, juicy, lighter red berry characters with mouth filling fruit weight and a naturally lighter tannin structure.

Geography: Pisa and Lowburn are positioned on the north side of the Cromwell basin, tucked up against the Pisa Range approximately halfway between Cromwell and the head of Lake Dunstan. The land has been formed from the same glacial events as Bendigo, however it is on the opposite side of the valley and thus features terraces and generally south or east facing slopes.

Climate: The open Cromwell basin allows for generally high levels of sunlight and a similar diurnal temperature pattern to Bendigo. However, the southerly fronts which are predominantly responsible for cold and wet weather in Central Otago generally follow the path of the Pisa Range and therefore result in higher rainfall than Bendigo.

Altitude: The lower terraces of the Pisa/Lowburn sub-region start at approximately 200m above sea level, considerably lower than the Bendigo and Gibbston sub-regions. This influences the climate and soil profile in which the vines are grown.

Bendigo

Pinot Noir grapes from the Bendigo sub-region provide rounded, mouth filling fruit weight and contribute deeper dark berry fruit and earthy characters with a strong tannin structure.

Geography: The Bendigo sub-region is a small, terraced sub-region on the east side of the Cromwell Basin, tucked into the Dunstan Range at the head of Lake Dunstan. The numerous glacial events have formed terraces at varying altitudes and gradual north facing slopes perfect for Pinot Noir.

Climate: The climate in Bendigo is unique to the area and due to the geographical protection of the Dunstan Range. The area experiences an extreme diurnal temperature patterns typified by hot dry days and cool nights, for example in February daytime temperatures reach 35C (95F) followed by night-time temperatures of 2C (35F).

Altitude: The lowest point of Bendigo starts at 237m above sea level, with older terraces formed by earlier glacial events up to 300m above sea level. The altitudinal level has a significant influence on the climate, air temperature and soil temperature.

Head office

Phone: +64 27 291 4429

Email: fraser@mohuawines.co.nz

Distributors

USA

Vineyard Brands 2000 Resource Drive,
Birmingham, AL 35242

Tel: 205 9808 802

Fax: 205 9800 408

www.vineyardbrands.com

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Pinot
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